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Ginny Porowski

GoGownTM

Healthcare entrepreneur and registered nurse Ginny Porowski designed the GoGown™ to address hospital-acquired infections, a significant concern in terms of human and financial resources. Ginny knew that used gowns and gloves, intended to protect health care workers and patients, were potential vehicles for spreading contaminants. She recognized that disposable isolation gowns and gloves are often discarded improperly and, as a result, spill over the waste receptacles in patients’ rooms, creating an environment in which people could unwittingly come into contact with often-invisible contaminants on discarded gowns and gloves.

GoGowns feature a patented attached interior wrapper. After removing the gown and gloves, the wearer rolls the gloves within the gown, winds this interior wrapper around the entire package and secures it using the affixed adhesive tab. The end result is a tightly bound, secure bundle whose size, shape and weight make it easy to discard without leaving any contaminated surfaces exposed. Ginny holds 2 US patents on her invention and has patents pending in China, India, EU and Canada.

Ginny joined forces with Lisa Bourget, healthcare product management and business development executive, to help with GoGown's commercialization effort. Together they found Edison Nation Medical, which secured a licensing agreement with Medline Industries, Inc. to manufacture and distribute the GoGown.

In addition to being a registered nurse and successful inventor, Ginny is a licensed professional counselor and consultant with more than 20 years of unique experience spanning nursing, behavioral health, innovation and business development. She combines a vibrant understanding of the healthcare system, the healthcare worker, the individual and the community.

For more GoGown information, please see the demo video showing its removal and disposal. For manufacturing/distribution information, please visit Medline Industries, Inc.

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Healthcare entrepreneur and registered nurse Ginny Porowski designed the GoGown™ to address hospital-acquired infections, a significant concern in terms of human and financial resources. Ginny knew that used gowns and gloves, intended to protect health care workers and patients, were potential vehicles for spreading contaminants. She recognized that disposable isolation gowns and gloves are often discarded improperly and, as a result, spill over the waste receptacles in patients’ rooms, creating an environment in which people could unwittingly come into contact with often-invisible contaminants on discarded gowns and gloves.

GoGowns feature a patented attached interior wrapper. After removing the gown and gloves, the wearer rolls the gloves within the gown, winds this interior wrapper around the entire package and secures it using the affixed adhesive tab. The end result is a tightly bound, secure bundle whose size, shape and weight make it easy to discard without leaving any contaminated surfaces exposed. Ginny holds 2 US patents on her invention and has patents pending in China, India, EU and Canada.

Ginny joined forces with Lisa Bourget, healthcare product management and business development executive, to help with GoGown's commercialization effort. Together they found Edison Nation Medical, which secured a licensing agreement with Medline Industries, Inc. to manufacture and distribute the GoGown.

In addition to being a registered nurse and successful inventor, Ginny is a licensed professional counselor and consultant with more than 20 years of unique experience spanning nursing, behavioral health, innovation and business development. She combines a vibrant understanding of the healthcare system, the healthcare worker, the individual and the community.

For more GoGown information, please see the demo video showing its removal and disposal. For manufacturing/distribution information, please visit Medline Industries, Inc.

Mark Stark

Natural Dexterous Hand

You may recognize Mark Stark’s invention, the affordable prosthetic hand that works as a system of pulleys rather than robotics, from the cover of Popular Science magazine. Mark’s invention came from his realization of the limitations of the prosthetic hook that his friend wears. Mark designed a hand that is extremely functional yet more affordable than costly robotic hands currently on the market.

His journey to invention started when he was a child growing up in St. Louis, designing and building go-carts with his older brother. By the time he was nine years old, he was the neighborhood “fix it” boy, and he still enjoys fixing things today. His path to working in engineering wasn’t the easiest; Mark did poorly in high school until he moved to a technical school and took Engineering Drafting. It was the days of designing with a pencil and paper that inspired him to pursue a degree in engineering 20 years later while working full time. Now Mark holds four company patents and is currently a mechanical designer, taking his early passion and successfully turning it into a viable career.

Mark's hopes for his prosthetic hand are long-term and far-reaching: he would like to see it improve thousands of lives, and with the initial feedback he has received, he has good reason to believe that the Natural Dexterous Hand will do so.

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You may recognize Mark Stark’s invention, the affordable prosthetic hand that works as a system of pulleys rather than robotics, from the cover of Popular Science magazine. Mark’s invention came from his realization of the limitations of the prosthetic hook that his friend wears. Mark designed a hand that is extremely functional yet more affordable than costly robotic hands currently on the market.

His journey to invention started when he was a child growing up in St. Louis, designing and building go-carts with his older brother. By the time he was nine years old, he was the neighborhood “fix it” boy, and he still enjoys fixing things today. His path to working in engineering wasn’t the easiest; Mark did poorly in high school until he moved to a technical school and took Engineering Drafting. It was the days of designing with a pencil and paper that inspired him to pursue a degree in engineering 20 years later while working full time. Now Mark holds four company patents and is currently a mechanical designer, taking his early passion and successfully turning it into a viable career.

Mark's hopes for his prosthetic hand are long-term and far-reaching: he would like to see it improve thousands of lives, and with the initial feedback he has received, he has good reason to believe that the Natural Dexterous Hand will do so.

Sean Hensler

Hensler Bone Press

Sean Hensler, a neurosurgical physician’s assistant along with his colleague, Dr. Thomas Melin, neurosurgeon, noticed one process in their operating room that was messy, inefficient and time-consuming. In any type of procedure in which grafting must be done, the surgeon either uses the patient’s own bone via a secondary site, such as the hip, or will use a biologic, a type of synthetic bone that is both expensive and brings more risk to the patient than using their own bone.

This is why it has become normal for the surgical team to try to salvage as much bone as possible from the original surgery site, and spend a significant amount of time sifting through blood, bone and fluid contents to gather bits of valuable bone. Sean and Dr. Melin both recognized the inefficiencies with this process, but it wasn’t until Sean was recovering from his own back surgery that he came up with a solution.

Sean was in a hotel room in Aspen recovering from surgery while his colleagues took to the slopes. It was in Aspen that the idea for a device that would press down bone fragments and filter away blood and fluid was born. He bought a notepad from Walgreens, took a bus into town and started scanning in sketches of his concept.

That was in February of 2011. By May, Hensler Surgical, LLC was formed, investors were secured and patents had been filed. The disposable Hensler Bone Press is currently in production for FDA testing, which is estimated to take three months. The Hensler Bone Press will offer surgery teams a practical, inexpensive method to save time and minimize interruption with its two-step method for bone collection. With the Hensler Bone Press, the end result is a usable product that can be immediately grafted, which will in turn improve patient care and reduce pain.

The Hensler Bone Press (HBP) was designed and engineered by Enventys, Edison Nation Medical's product development arm. For additional information please visit www.HenslerSurgical.com.

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Sean Hensler, a neurosurgical physician’s assistant along with his colleague, Dr. Thomas Melin, neurosurgeon, noticed one process in their operating room that was messy, inefficient and time-consuming. In any type of procedure in which grafting must be done, the surgeon either uses the patient’s own bone via a secondary site, such as the hip, or will use a biologic, a type of synthetic bone that is both expensive and brings more risk to the patient than using their own bone.

This is why it has become normal for the surgical team to try to salvage as much bone as possible from the original surgery site, and spend a significant amount of time sifting through blood, bone and fluid contents to gather bits of valuable bone. Sean and Dr. Melin both recognized the inefficiencies with this process, but it wasn’t until Sean was recovering from his own back surgery that he came up with a solution.

Sean was in a hotel room in Aspen recovering from surgery while his colleagues took to the slopes. It was in Aspen that the idea for a device that would press down bone fragments and filter away blood and fluid was born. He bought a notepad from Walgreens, took a bus into town and started scanning in sketches of his concept.

That was in February of 2011. By May, Hensler Surgical, LLC was formed, investors were secured and patents had been filed. The disposable Hensler Bone Press is currently in production for FDA testing, which is estimated to take three months. The Hensler Bone Press will offer surgery teams a practical, inexpensive method to save time and minimize interruption with its two-step method for bone collection. With the Hensler Bone Press, the end result is a usable product that can be immediately grafted, which will in turn improve patient care and reduce pain.

The Hensler Bone Press (HBP) was designed and engineered by Enventys, Edison Nation Medical's product development arm. For additional information please visit www.HenslerSurgical.com.

Bob Heitkamp

SiteSaver®

Throughout his life, Bob Heitkamp has enjoyed tinkering with machinery, tools and processes, but never imagined he’d dive into full-on inventing – until unexpected and unfortunate events sparked an incredible idea.

After undergoing a simple knee surgery, Bob was nine days into recovery when he had what he believed to be a heart attack. In the days that followed, he suffered a pulmonary embolism and eventually ended up back in the hospital for 17 days.

While in the hospital Bob struggled to sleep at night, which he eventually realized was due to his fear of displacing the IV in his sleep. This sparked the idea for an innovation that would keep IVs securely in place on a patient’s hand, and would be a better solution than simply taping the tubing down. The next day, as Bob filled out his insurance paperwork, he turned the form over and began sketching his idea. Showing the sketch to a few of the nurses who had cared for him, Bob received extremely positive and excited responses, and he vowed to them, "Someday, I will make it for you."

Bob has made good on his promise with the invention of Site Saver®, a device that attaches the IV needle and tubing to the patient’s hand securely and comfortably. He hopes to see it not only benefit healthcare professionals, who must frequently replace lost IVs – costing both time and money – but most importantly, improve care for patients who, like him, find themselves dependent on an IV to save their life.

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Throughout his life, Bob Heitkamp has enjoyed tinkering with machinery, tools and processes, but never imagined he’d dive into full-on inventing – until unexpected and unfortunate events sparked an incredible idea.

After undergoing a simple knee surgery, Bob was nine days into recovery when he had what he believed to be a heart attack. In the days that followed, he suffered a pulmonary embolism and eventually ended up back in the hospital for 17 days.

While in the hospital Bob struggled to sleep at night, which he eventually realized was due to his fear of displacing the IV in his sleep. This sparked the idea for an innovation that would keep IVs securely in place on a patient’s hand, and would be a better solution than simply taping the tubing down. The next day, as Bob filled out his insurance paperwork, he turned the form over and began sketching his idea. Showing the sketch to a few of the nurses who had cared for him, Bob received extremely positive and excited responses, and he vowed to them, "Someday, I will make it for you."

Bob has made good on his promise with the invention of Site Saver®, a device that attaches the IV needle and tubing to the patient’s hand securely and comfortably. He hopes to see it not only benefit healthcare professionals, who must frequently replace lost IVs – costing both time and money – but most importantly, improve care for patients who, like him, find themselves dependent on an IV to save their life.